Sermon

Religion, Science and the Pandemic I: “Religion without Science is Blind”

Sunday, Aug. 15, 2021, Preacher: Rev. Dr. Ambury Stuart

 

Sunday, August 15
Twelfth After Pentecost
Rev. Dr. Ambury Stuart
Eleanor Daley, Director of Music
Quartet:
Soprano 1 – Amy Dodington
Soprano 2 – Anne Bornath
Alto 1 – Andrea Ludwig
Alto 2 – Lynn Featherstone
Scripture: Philippians 4:4-9
Reader: Scot Denton

 

Prelude Rejoice in the Lord Alway             Anon., formerly attributed to John Redford (ca. 1500-1547)

Rejoice in the Lord alway,
and again I say, rejoice.
Let your softness be known unto all men:
the Lord is e’en hand.
Be careful for nothing:
but in all prayer and supplication,
let your petitions be manifest unto God with giving of thanks.
And the peace of God,
which passeth all understanding,
keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesu. Amen.
(Philippians 4:4-7)

 

Opening Hymn Rejoice Today with One Accord

Rejoice today with one accord,
Sing out with exultation;
Rejoice and praise our mighty Lord,
Whose arm hath brought salvation.
His works of love proclaim
The greatness of his name,
For he is God alone
Who hath his mercy shown;
Let all his saints adore him.

When in distress to him we cried,
He heard our sad complaining.
O trust in him, whate’er betide;
His love is all sustaining.
Triumphant songs of praise
To him our hearts shall raise;
Now every voice shall say,
“O praise our God alway”;
Let all his saints adore him.
(Henry Williams Baker, 1821-1877)

 

Quartet Os Justi             E. Daley
Soprano 1 – Amy Dodington
Soprano 2 – Anne Bornath
Alto 1 – Andrea Ludwig
Alto 2 – Lynn Featherstone

 

 

Closing Hymn Rejoice, the Lord is King             arr. John Rutter (b. 1945)

Rejoice, the Lord is King;
Your Lord and King adore;
Rejoice, give thanks and sing
And triumph evermore:
Lift up your heart, lift up your voice:
Rejoice; again I say, rejoice!

Jesus the Saviour reigns,
The God of truth and love;
When he had purged our stains,
He took his seat above:
Lift up your heart, lift up your voice:
Rejoice; again I say, rejoice!

Rejoice in glorious hope;
Our Lord and Judge shall come
And take his servants up
To their eternal home:
Lift up your heart, lift up your voice:
Rejoice; again I say, rejoice!
Amen.
(Charles Wesley, 1707-1788)

 

Choral Commissioning             E. Daley
Fairlawn Avenue Senior Choir section leads

The Lord bless you and keep you;
The Lord make his face to shine on you
And be gracious unto you.
The Lord lift up the light of his countenance upon you,
And give you peace. Amen.

 

Postlude Whatever is True           Michael John Trotta (b. 1978)

Is there anything pure?
Think on these things:

Whatever is true,
Whatever is honourable,
Whatever is just,
Think on these things.
Whatever is pure,
Whatever’s commendable,
Whatever is lovely,
Think on these things.

Pure and lovely.

Whatever is true,
Whatever is honourable,
Whatever is just,
Think on these things.
Whatever is pure,
Whatever’s commendable,
Whatever is lovely,
Think on these things.

If there is any excellence,
Anything worthy of praise,
And if we can’t find these things,
We’ll make them for ourselves.

Whatever is true,
Whatever is honourable,
Whatever is just,
Think on these things.
Whatever is pure,
Whatever’s commendable,
Whatever is lovely,
Think on these things.

Pure and lovely.
(Philippians 4:8,
Additional lyrics by M. J. T.)

 

♪ Music notes ♪

John Redford (ca. 1500-1547) was an English composer, organist and dramatist of the Tudor period (1485-1603). From about 1525, he was the organist at St. Paul’s Cathedral, and was also choirmaster there from 1531 until his death. Redford is notable as one of the earliest composers, rather than improvisers, of organ music. He notated a significant quantity of keyboard music, all of it liturgical in function, mostly based on plainchant melodies. Although formerly attributed as the composer of Rejoice in the Lord Alway, in the only early source, the piece is anonymous, and the text set did not become significant until the publication of the first “Book of Common Prayer” two years after Redford’s death.

Henry Williams Baker (1821-1877) was an English hymn writer. He was born in London, and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. 1844, and M.A. 1847. From 1851 until his death in 1877 he was Vicar of Monkland, Herefordshire, during which time he rendered the Church great service by editing “Hymns Ancient and Modern,” one of the most popular of modern hymn-books, to which he contributed a number of original hymns, metrical litanies, and translations.

John Rutter (b. 1945) is an English composer, conductor, editor, arranger, and record producer, mainly of choral music. He studied music at Clare College, England, and later became the College’s first full-time Director of Music in 1975, leading the choir to international prominence. In 1981 he founded his own professional choir, the Cambridge Singers, with which he has made many recordings of the sacred choral repertoire. Rutter’s music is very well known and much beloved in choral circles, and is performed worldwide. His larger-scale works – particularly his Gloria (1974), Requiem (1985), and Magnificat (1990) are also well established in the choral repertoire, and the late Sir David Willcocks considered him to be the most gifted composer of his generation.

Charles Wesley (1707-1788) was an English leader of the Methodist movement, most widely known for writing about 6,500 hymn texts. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford, and after graduating with a master’s degree in classical languages and literature, Charles followed his father and brother into Anglican orders in 1735. He was a younger brother of Methodist founder John Wesley, and Anglican cleric Samuel Wesley the Younger, and he became the father of musician Samuel Wesley, and the grandfather of musician Samuel Sebastian Wesley.

Michael John Trotta (b. 1978) is an American composer, conductor and clinician. Prior to his work as a full-time composer, he taught at the elementary, secondary and university levels, and also worked as a church director of music. His compositions have been described as inspired, deeply stirring and elegant, but always singable.

 

 

 

 

Music Sources:

Rejoice in the Lord Alway Anon., formerly attributed to John https://youtu.be/MqX5IhDALFA
Rejoice Today with One Accord https://youtu.be/8TvMO7_ys3E
Os Justi E. Daley https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhUxxpka-wo
Rejoice, the Lord is King arr. John Rutter https://youtu.be/xA0jM77Qers
Whatever is True Michael John Trotta https://youtu.be/jOiKzNgY9t4